The Orphan’s Tale, by Pam Jenoff

In the midst of World War II, two women try to survive–and help others survive, as well.

Noa is young and naive when a German soldier sneaks into her bed and leaves her with child. When her parents find out, her father throws her out. Noa takes refuge in the care of a state-sponsored home for women in similar circumstances and her baby is taken from her. Still reeling from the pain of that forced separation, she cannot help but reach out to help a Jewish baby whom she finds in a railway car filled with other such children en route to “disposal.” Noa grabs the frigid but still alive infant and runs into the night.

Astrid is a trapeze artist in a travelling circus who has sought refuge and safety. Before the war, Astrid married a German officer. They were happy for years but, when war breaks out, her husband abruptly divorces her–a German soldier cannot be wed to a Jewish woman. Astrid returns to her home, but finds her family and the family circus gone. She goes to a neighbor and head of a rival circus, seeking information about her family. Instead, Astrid finds employment and protection, as the German circus takes her in as one of their own.

Noa and Astrid’s stories become inextricably linked when Noa arrives at the circus with baby Theo. Their contentious relationship gradually warms to a genuine friendship and will be the thing that saves one of their lives.

The Orphan’s Tale is a story of extraordinary courage from ordinary people and is both resonant and inspiring.

One thought on “The Orphan’s Tale, by Pam Jenoff

  1. 🙂

    On Fri, Jan 25, 2019 at 12:11 AM The Girl with Book Lungs wrote:

    > jennaczaplewski posted: ” In the midst of World War II, two women try to > survive–and help others survive, as well. Noa is young and naive when a > German soldier sneaks into her bed and leaves her with child. When her > parents find out, her father throws her out. Noa takes r” >

    Liked by 1 person

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